Helping Students Pursue Their College & Career Aspirations

Parent & Student Resources

In the book, A High School Plan for Students with College-Bound Dreams, the author notes:

“The summer months between 8th grade and your senior year of high school should not be squandered. Take advantage of the many opportunities to explore your talents, interests, and abilities. Unlike the summer months during elementary and middle school, this is not the time to relax at grandma′s house sitting back and watching television or playing video games. The summer months provide opportunities to attend camps or summer school, compete in AAU or USATF sports competitions, pursue internships, or otherwise engage in programs or opportunities that will enhance your college application package.”

We encourage students to take advantage of the many available pre-college, summer programs, and internship opportunities. Click onto any of the following links to download a partial listing of available programs and links to other web sites.

Share your comments, experiences, and let us know about pre-college and summer programs that you have had positive experiences with:

Get a Tutor

Tutors are accessible for most situations and for most budgets. NCLB guarantees tutorial assistance for students attending low-performing schools; most schools, including high school volunteer programs, offer tutors or study sessions.

Many community organizations, such as churches, have students and professionals capable of tutoring a broad range of subjects. Most teachers also offer before and after school help.

We have long suspected that the pace at which teachers are forced to move through the curriculum is too fast to ensure that our son is learning and retaining what he knows. His course grades do little more that to assure us that he has turned in his work, behaved in class, and performed reasonably well on the various tests and quizzes that his teachers have given. Subsequently, we begin each school year by lining up tutors. He currently has tutors in math, physics, and SAT prep.

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Monitor Test Scores

There is usually a gap between when students are tested and when the test scores are actually sent home. Unfortunately, students could care less and parents often ignore test results. You can only provide the appropriate academic intervention if you take the time to go over academic scores with your child, their teachers, and counselor.

Children who are already doing well need enrichment in order to do even better. On the other hand, children who are not doing well require intervention to catch up. However, part of the process of developing the appropriate action plan is taking the time to review your child’s test scores and to develop a set of strategies.

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Do More Math

Math is a language, and, like any language, you can only learn it by using it. The school curriculum is simply inadequate to ensure that your child is appropriately mastering mathematic skills. Concepts that are taught in the third grade may not be taught again until middle school. Important concepts may not be taught at all. The only way to ensure that your child is progressing satisfactorily in math is to ensure that he or she is doing math daily. If the school provides a book with an answer key for your child to practice daily, that is great. If not, you can pick up books at the bookstore, library, or have your child work math problems on various Internet websites.

Anytime your children question why you are requiring that they read daily or do math daily, just share with them the NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) results for his or her demographic group.

Following are the percentages of students, by race, who performed at the advanced level in reading:

  • 10% of Asian students performed at the advanced level in reading
  • 7% of White students performed at the advanced level in reading
  • 2% of Hispanic students performed at the advanced level in reading
  • 1% of Black students performed at the advanced level in reading

Following are the percentages of students, by race, who performed at the advanced level on the 2009 NAEP in math:

  • 10% of Asian students performed at the advanced level in math
  • 3% of White students performed at the advanced level in math
  • 0% of Black students performed at the advanced level in math
  • 0% of Hispanic students performed at the advanced level in math

Followthe data...

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